Bibliography and Index of the Sirenia and Desmostylia  


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"Asper, Edward D"

Asper, Edward D.: SEE ALSO Beusse et al.; Cornell et al.; Dierauf, L. A., 1990; Odell et al., 1981; O'Shea, Rathbun et al., 1985. (detail)
 
 
Cornell, Lanny H.; Asper, Edward D. (detail)
   
1978
A census of captive marine mammals in North America.
Internatl. Zoo Yearbk. 18: 220-224.
 
 
Asper, Edward D. (detail)
   
1979
Commitment to manatee health, research: Sea World's role.
Florida Conserv. News (Florida Dept. Nat. Resources) 15(2): 14-17. 6 figs. Nov. 1979.
–See also Appendix 1.
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Asper, Edward D.; Searles, Stan W. (detail)
   
1981
Husbandry of injured and orphaned manatees at Sea World of Florida. In: R. L. Brownell, Jr., & K. Ralls (eds.), The West Indian manatee in Florida. Proceedings of a workshop held in Orlando, Florida 27-29 March 1978 (q.v.).
Tallahassee, Florida Dept. Nat. Res. (iv + 154): 121-127. 3 tabs. 3 figs.
–Describes the care of three injured adults and one orphaned calf, emphasizing their diets (including artificial milk formula), food intake, and weight gain. See also Beusse et al. (1981b) regarding the three adults.
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Odell, Daniel Keith; Forrester, Donald J.; Asper, Edward D. (detail)
   
1981
A preliminary analysis of organ weights and sexual maturity in the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus). In: R. L. Brownell, Jr., & K. Ralls (eds.), The West Indian manatee in Florida. Proceedings of a workshop held in Orlando, Florida 27-29 March 1978 (q.v.).
Tallahassee, Florida Dept. Nat. Res. (iv + 154): 52-65. 3 tabs. 7 figs.
–Presents data from salvaged carcasses on body weight vs. length, and weights of heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, adrenals, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, and gonads, and discusses gonad weight as an indicator of sexual maturity (estimated to occur at body lengths of 275 cm in males and 260 cm in females).
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Beusse, D. O., Jr.; Asper, Edward D.; Searles, Stan W. (detail)
   
1981a
Some causes of manatee mortality. In: R. L. Brownell, Jr., & K. Ralls (eds.), The West Indian manatee in Florida. Proceedings of a workshop held in Orlando, Florida 27-29 March 1978 (q.v.).
Tallahassee, Florida Dept. Nat. Res. (iv + 154): 98-101. 1 tab. 1 fig.
–Lists carcasses of T. manatus recovered in Florida, 1974-77, and gives detailed findings on the three that were fresh enough for necropsy. One died of septicemia with pneumonia after entanglement in a crab-trap line, another from septicemia without obvious wounds, and a third from propeller cuts and pneumonia. See also Irvine, Odell & Campbell (1981).
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Beusse, D. O., Jr.; Asper, Edward D.; Searles, Stan W. (detail)
   
1981b
Diagnosis and treatment of manatees at Sea World of Florida. In: R. L. Brownell, Jr., & K. Ralls (eds.), The West Indian manatee in Florida. Proceedings of a workshop held in Orlando, Florida 27-29 March 1978 (q.v.).
Tallahassee, Florida Dept. Nat. Res. (iv + 154): 111-120. 3 tabs. 3 figs.
–Reports on the successful treatment of three T. manatus for entanglement in a crab-trap line, propeller cuts, and a possible retained placenta, respectively. Includes extensive tables showing the results of blood studies during treatment. See also Asper & Searles (1981) regarding these manatees.
 
 
Cornell, Lanny H.; Asper, Edward D.; Duffield, D. A. (detail)
   
1982
Census up-date: captive marine mammals in North America.
Internatl. Zoo Yearbk. 22: 227-232. Illus.
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O'Shea, Thomas J.; Rathbun, Galen B.; Asper, Edward D.; Searles, Stan W. (detail)
   
1985
Tolerance of West Indian manatees to capture and handling.
Biol. Conserv. 33(4): 335-349. 2 tabs.
–Describes procedures used in capturing and handling Florida manatees, and reports that none of the 92 animals captured between 1975 and 1983 showed evidence of capture myopathy. Blood chemistry data are given for some of these and, by way of comparison, for captive manatees. Concludes that manatees, unlike dugongs, seem not to be susceptible to capture stress.

Daryl P. Domning, Research Associate, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560, and Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059.
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